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Thread: Canadian ( Peameal ) Bacon eh!

  1. #1
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    Canadian ( Peameal ) Bacon eh!

    Started my first attempt at making peameal bacon this morning. I bought a pork loin and trimmed it up. Cut in to 3 manageable pieces. It's in a very simple brine in the fridge for a week. I've started to buy big pieces of meat and doing the butchering myself. This was 5lbs for about $12. I cut off 30 cubes for kebobs, 4 boneless pork chops/schnitzel and 3 just over a lb. of loin for the peameal. I estimate about 20 servings for two.

  2. #2
    Trusted Senior Member brigid's Avatar
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    Very smart, Karen. You will be all set for a long time! The cold winter is beckoning.

  3. #3
    scuse my ignorance, what is peameal bacon

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    Trusted Senior Member brigid's Avatar
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    I have never heard of it either. Maybe it is common in Canada.

  5. #5
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    Peameal Bacon explained

    Peameal Bacon is what Americans call Canadian Bacon. It gets confusing because up here we call Canadian bacon which is a smoked product to us. South of the border you call it Canadian Bacon but we call it Peameal bacon, told you it was confusing. Anyway.
    Peameal bacon is a pork tenderloin brined for a week or more. Recipes vary. Then it is taken out and rolled in yellow cornmeal, aged in the frig for about a week then cooked. Either oven baked ( the best) or sliced and pan fried. Served like bacon and eggs for breakfast. On a kaiser roll. Anywhere you serve bacon.
    The name comes from the original covering of ground yellow peas. Not used any more. The coating and rest time dry it out so it is a very firm cut and much more healthier than regular bacon since all visible fat is removed.
    Go to Google and type in Peameal Bacon. Search. Then switch to image. What you will find is various pictures of the finished product and how it's served.

  6. #6
    Thanks karen, very interesting, what is in the brine ????

  7. #7
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    It is a ratio of water, brown sugar, salt, peppercorns and Dijon Mustard in this recipe. However it can have some chemicals I can live without.
    4 cups of water
    1/2 brown sugar
    1/2 kosher (course) salt
    2 T dijon mustard
    2T peppercorn

    bring water sugar and salt to almost boil. Your trying to desolve. add mustard and peppercorn

    Adjust up or down according to volume required. Must cover meat. put in frig to chill. add meat. turn every day for 7 days. remove and pat dry. roll in yellow cornmeal ( we can only buy the medium grind here) place in frig for a week to "dry out" then cook, smoke, bake, pan fry your choice.

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    You have me drooling, Karen. Good bacon is just so difficult to come by but we've a beaut butcher not an hour's drive from here who smokes her own on the premises. Could double the price and still I'd buy it! I also get the left-over bones (almost for free) and they make the world's bestest ever soups. In fact I can feel my famous pea-and-ham coming on now so thanks heaps.

  9. #9
    Thanks Karen, I may just give it a go after this weekend.
    Brian, what;s in your pea and ham soup, I make it quite a lot

  10. #10
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    Linda, my number one trick is to forget about ham bones and instead use the world's meanest and ugliest bacon bones, preferably smoked. There's heaps of meat still on them, plus all the marrow, and the smokey back-taste goes right through. (Serve at least one bone in each bowl). My base boiling-stock is carrots and broccoli put through the blender with some water then I simmer it all for a few hours with a bootful of green and yellow split peas and pearl barley. Turn it off until tomorrow, then reheat it with a child's bucketful of celery thrown in. Bit of crusty bread, a few good mates and it's not a bad old world.

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