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Thread: Cinnamon rolls

  1. #1

    Cinnamon rolls

    I made cinnamon rolls and during the first rising, they did not rise as much as I thought they would. After they were cut, they were supposed to double in size and they didn't. I used fresh yeast and even measured the temperature of the water as not to get it too hot. Any ideas?

  2. #2

    Cinnamon rolls

    There are so many things that might go wrong, it's impossible to pinpoint what might have happened.

    Some elements that might contribute to poor volume in your cinnamon rolls or any other bread, are too much salt, not enough liquid, low gluten flour, and under- or over-mixing.

    Often, if you are located in a dry climate, you may need to add more liquids to your mixture than is called for in the recipe. Also, sometimes overly sweet, heavy doughs with lots of eggs are reluctant to rise well in hot, humid weather.

    If your flour is a weak, low-gluten flour, as are some flours in the South (ie White Lily), try adding vital wheat gluten. Or you can switch to one of the bread flours with a higher gluten-protein content such as King Arthur or Pillsbury Better for Bread. It's best to use All-Purpose flour for muffins, coffee cakes and cookies, and to use Bread flour for breads, unless you are making Italian or French style breads where a hard crust is important.

    Try substituting nonfat dry powdered milk for the milk in your recipe. This is more beneficial for improved yeast development than regular unscalded milk. A drop of lemon, orange juice, or citric acid (less than half a teaspoon) will also help.

    Be sure to knead for the required time to develop gluten and structure in the bread. The kneading also warms up the dough and gives it a boost in the initial rise. Required kneading time is usually about 8-10 minutes without a mixer, or 4-5 minutes if you're using a KitchenAid.

    When you set your dough to rise, place it in a warm draft-free location. If the dough catches a draft, it may not rise. A good place for rising is on top of a hot water heater, or on top of some refrigerators that are warm on top. You can also heat up an oven to 100-150 degrees and then shut off the oven and allow the dough to rise there with the door slightly ajar.

    If the dough hasn't risen to double within the required time period, it doesn't hurt to allow it to sit awhile longer, in fact, longer yeast development times help improve flavor.

    When a recipe asks you to allow your dough to double in volume, you shouldn't take it literally. "Almost doubled in volume" is a more accurate translation. If you allow your dough to actually double in volume, you will lose some of the "oven spring" that improves the final volume achieved during cooking, which is more important for the end result.

    Try changing recipes - some recipes aren't the best for your climate and set of ingredients. You may have better luck with a different recipe. If you still have trouble the next time with a new recipe, try a different batch of yeast from a new store.

    -Belle

  3. #3
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    Cinnamon rolls

    venus R, miller.Yeah, well did u put it in a warm place?

  4. #4
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    Cinnamon rolls

    try the active dry yeast i use that kind

  5. #5
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    Cinnamon rolls

    Here's what Shirley O. Corriher's book, Cookwise, says about problems with rising:
    How to tell why the bread did not riseThere are two reasons why bread does not rise: One is that the yeast is dead, and the other is that you do not have good gluten development. This is about all that can go wrong with a yeast dough, If the yeast is producing carbon dioxide and the satiny sheets of bubble-gum-like gluten are there to catch and hold the carbon dioxide, the bread is going to rise.

    You can tell immediately whether you have a yeast problem or a gluten problem. Poke at the uncooked dough and try to pull a piece off. If the dough is elastic and springy, your gluten is fine, but the yeast is dead. Dissolve another package of yeast (this time hopefully alive!) in a few tablespoons of warm water and knead the live yeast into the dough. It should rise nicely now.

    If the dough appears to have fine bubbles in it, tears easily when you pull at it, and has little elasticity, you have a gluten problem. You can add bread flour or gluten flour and more liquid to moisten the flour. Then the dough must be kneaded again.

    Although this excerpt doesn't mention it, the yeast could be dead (or otherwise limited) for a few different reasons:The yeast is old, and some or all of it has died.The water you used was not the right temperature (usually, between 105F and 115F), so the yeast either never got started properly, or was killed.The dough was hot enough to kill the yeast (e.g. if you deliberately put it in a warmer place to rise, but it was TOO warm - such as when some people put it over a pot of hot water - if that water is too hot, or is allowed to keep boiling, it could kill the yeast, and even precook part of the dough!).Other ingredients in the dough could also affect rising. If the dough has certain spices in it, that could increase or decrease the action of the yeast.

  6. #6
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    Cinnamon rolls

    Hi Anonymous,
    mkae sure and it is imperative that there is no drafts at all in or aorund your dough while it is rising, this will also cause your dough not to rise to the level it should,it will rise some what but not like it should. take the rack out of your oven upper rack, and then turn oven on to 275f bring up to tempeture, and then shut it off,wait 10 minutes and then put your dough in the oven to proof, this will stop the drafts from entering and the warm oven will help in the rising process,all the above mentioned by labradors is so true,always check the expirey date on the package or bottle,for cinnomon buns i use 1/2n1/2 bread flour and cake flour,that's just the way i do mine and have no problems with it, but before i do anything i check on the yeast,, if your not sure proof some yeast first, with some sugar(sugar activates the yeast to get it going) feeding it,and water of course , you'll be able to tell after 5 minutes whether or not your yeast is good,. even though the expirery date may not say outdated it may well be.
    check all these, and hope it works out for you, on your next batch,
    happy baking

    remember,STRESSED spelt backwards is "DESSERTS"
    happy cooking
    Ron

  7. #7

    Cinnamon rolls

    using active dry yeast and the right water temp will do the trick. also dont roll them so tight. place them covered in a warm area away from draft. most important make sure your yeast, flour are not old. best to make these rolls at room temp.


    do fish burp?

    goldie

  8. #8
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    Cinnamon rolls

    Was the liquid you used at the correct temp. ?

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