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Thread: Measurements

  1. #1
    ImissTexas52
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    Measurements

    I've cooked for a long time. It was usually done by what "looked right" or "smelled right". But it's only the last few years that I've really had to pay attention to the nutritional values of my recipes (diabetic in the family, sodium monitoring, etc.)

    I've recently noticed that I don't know how to read some measurements in some of my recipes! I learned that 8 ounces was a cup. Period.

    So I'm confused when an ingredient reads, "4 ounces fresh mushrooms, sliced (about 1-1/2 cups). Huh? When did 4 ounces become one and a half cups?

    Another example is "1 cup (4 ounces) shredded Swiss Cheese". What? Now 4 ounces equals a cup? Or a bag of shredded cheese says it contains 2 cups (8 ounces).

    Does a cup ever equal 8 ounces any more? Or does that only apply to liquids?

    Now that I have to pay so much attention to what I'm putting in the food, I find that I don't always know how much to measure out or even how to measure it! It's very confusing to me but I figure someone here can explain how to interpret this.

    Thank you very much.

  2. #2
    Trusted Senior Member
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    measurements

    mushrooms 4 oz weight = 1.5 cups
    1 cup shredded Swiss cheese = 4 ounces weight
    2 c cheese = 8 ounces weight.
    a cup will equal 8 ounces when they are both liquid
    many recipes give the weight and volume(liquid) measurements.
    This will come in handy when you go to purchase, it's by weight but recipes are by volume.
    bottom line is an ounce can be a volume and/or "liquid" measurement.
    Soooo. you will get the hang of it and be grateful your not in Canada we deal with ounces, lbs, = grams,kilograms= ounces, cups, pints etc.
    Then you get recipes with half Imperial and half metric... Those are just too much fun

  3. #3
    Moderator CM's Avatar
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    Hi ImissTexas52,

    Eight fluid ounces equals a cup in volume, but if you're measuring flour, 1 cup (volume) equals 6 ounces (unsifted) or 4 1/4 oz (sifted)! But that's a different subject.

    The examples you provided, (4 oz mushrooms, sliced (about 1-1/2 cups)) are referring to Yield. The yield is calculated after the ingredient is cleaned and trimmed, then prepared as directed (in this case, sliced). If the ingredient is cooked, yield also accounts for shrinkage or expansion of the cooked food.

    Common mushrooms (or champignons) are sized by the number of mushrooms per pound, and come in sizes small through extra large (3/4"-3+").

    One pound of medium champignon mushrooms=1 quart raw whole or 5 cups raw sliced or 6 cups raw chopped, or 2 cups cooked sliced or diced. To add to the confusion, different kinds of mushrooms have different yields.

    So, in figuring dietary quantities, your best bet is to use weights of foods after they are prepared (either raw or cooked), then look them up according to weight. Cooks.com has a nutrition database search here or you can buy a digital scale with nutritional information for many foods built-in. Some of the dietary scales allow you to keep a tally of your food intake for the day - the Salter scale allows you to track the day's intake for two people. A Tare function is handy to have in any scale as it helps you to reset to 0 while food is on the plate and add more ingredients to the dish.

  4. #4
    ImissTexas52
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    Measurements

    Good grief! I'm pushing 60 years old and I feel like I just picked up my very first saucepan to try to boil some water.

    Thank you very much for the information and especially the nutritional information resources. I can get some good information from them.

    Once again, I sure am glad I found this forum.

  5. #5
    Moderator CM's Avatar
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    You're welcome, hopefully some of the info might be useful. There's always more to learn about cooking.

    We're happy to have you with us!

  6. #6
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    This thread is really interesting! I can relate to what you said about quantities in recipes, ImissTexas52. There comes a time, all of a sudden, where what you know about cooking needs review and fine-tuning.

    My husband insists a pint is not necessisarily a pound the world around. I guess he's right!

    I have a funny little plastic scale, with a removeable plastic pan that I use to weigh some ingredients. Its a cheap-o, but does just fine. I was surprised to see how small one ounce of cheese (a favorite food) really is! Ditto for meat servings....

    I got a little measuring glass that has metric, tea and tablespoons, ounces, etc. recently. It has 'odd' measures on it, like 2.5 oz, etc. It has been very helpful. I still use the quart, pint, and one cup measuring glasses, and the measuring spoons, too.

    Then there are the sizings for baking pans, casseroles, cake dishes, pudding dishes, etc. Glad I'm not in Canada, or Europe. I would really get confused!

    Some of my best confusion occurs when harvesting and processing our fruits. Uh-oh!

  7. #7
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    A pint IS a pound the world around when it's liquid, pat hubby on the cheek and tell him "nice try!".....

  8. #8
    Fledgling Member La Cuisiniér's Avatar
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    Density Makes a Difference...

    Quote Originally Posted by K. Slink View Post
    A pint IS a pound the world around when it's liquid, pat hubby on the cheek and tell him "nice try!".....
    Trying not to disagree with you, but... due to density properties, there are liquids that will weigh differently per the same volume.

    La Cuisiniér Diabétique

    "Anyone can boil water and call themselves a Cook...but it's "flamboyancé" that separates the Chef from a Cook!!"

  9. #9
    Fledgling Member La Cuisiniér's Avatar
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    Hope This Helps...

    Here's a little something that might help "I Miss Texas 52" with their measuring problems.

    The "Pampered Chef" has 2 unique measuring devices/cylinders called "Measure-All's". One is their 2-cup @ $10.50... while the other is their "Mini" 1 cup @ $6.50. I have them both... and have found them to be quite useful in most kitchen/cooking situations.

    La Cuisiniér Diabétique

    "Anyone can boil water and call themselves a Cook...but it's "flamboyancé" that separates the Chef from a Cook!!"

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